Results of new antibody treatment for Sézary syndrome

The Lancet Oncology has recently published results of a phase 1 trial of a potential new treatment for T-cell skin lymphoma

Text that says Results

The Lancet Oncology has recently published results of a phase 1 trial of a potential new treatment for T-cell skin lymphoma.

The drug, currently known by the code IPH4102, is the first in a new class of antibody therapies. It targets a protein called KIR3DL2, found on the surface of T-cell skin lymphoma cells, especially the cells that are cancerous in people with Sézary syndrome.

The phase 1 trial included 44 people with T-cell skin lymphoma that had come back (relapsed) or had not responded (refractory) to previous treatment. Most of the people who took part in the study had Sézary syndrome, a rare, fast-growing (high-grade) skin lymphoma.

The study found that IPH4102 was safe in people with relapsed or refractory T-cell skin lymphoma. The most common side effects were swelling in the hands and lower legs, fatigue and low white blood cell count.

IPH4102 showed encouraging clinical activity. The results were especially promising in people with Sézary syndrome. If larger scale clinical trials confirm these results, IPH4102 could become a new treatment option for people with Sézary syndrome.

A phase 2 trial of IPH4102 called TELLOMAK is now underway in people with Sézary syndrome and other types of T-cell lymphoma that make the KIR3DL2 protein. This trial is not yet open in the UK.

To find out more about clinical trials for lymphoma, or to search for a trial that might be suitable for you – including the TELLOMAK trial when it is open – visit Lymphoma TrialsLink.

11 July 2019