Lymphoma and COVID-19 videos

On this page you will find two webinars where experts answer frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Videos on this page:

We also have a number of wellbeing videos available, including on emotional wellbeing.


COVID-19 vaccines - your questions answered: webinar 2 (August 2021)

This video was recorded from a live webinar on 11 August 2021. 

Expert host and panel

We are very grateful to our expert host and panel of experts for giving up their time to attend the webinar:

Professor John Radford, Professor of Medical Oncology, The Christie Hospital, Manchester

Dr Graham Collins, Haematology Consultant, Oxford University Hospitals

Dr Wendy Osborne, Consultant Haematologist, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne

Dr Shirley D'Sa, WM lead clinician, University College London Hospitals

Watch the webinar

 

 

Download a transcription of this webinar


COVID-19 vaccines - your questions answered

This video was recorded from a live webinar on 15 January 2021. 

Expert panel

We are very grateful to our expert panel of experts for giving up their time to attend the webinar:

Dr Graham Collins, Haematology Consultant, Oxford University Hospitals

Dr Wendy Osborne, Consultant Haematologist, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne

Dr Robert Marcus, Consultant Haematologist, HCA Healthcare, London 

Dr Shirley Hopper, Medical Assessor, MHRA 

Watch the webinar

During the webinar we received some additional questions, which the guest panel have answered here.

Can having the vaccine ‘re-awaken’ or stimulate other medical conditions (such as pre-existing medical conditions) or blood cancers?

There is no evidence from the clinical trials that pre-existing medical conditions can be ‘re-awakened’. It is not expected that blood cancer would be re-awaken or stimulate by the vaccine either, and it is not something that is seen with any other vaccine (for example, the annual flu vaccine). However, the MHRA is continually monitoring the safety of the vaccines during the roll-out. If there is any evidence that certain conditions can be re-awakened, this will be added to the Information for UK Recipients which can be found here: https://coronavirus-yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/productinformation

Can I have the COVID vaccine if I have had another vaccination recently (for example, the flu vaccine)? 

You can still have the COVID vaccine, but it is important to wait between the vaccinations. For the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, the clinical trials suggest the flu vaccine can be given 2 weeks before or 2 weeks after the COVID-19 vaccine. For the AstraZeneca (Oxford) vaccine, the trials suggest that the flu and pneumococcal vaccines can be given 7 days before or 7 days after the COVID-19 vaccine. 

What sort of allergies would be a contraindication for the vaccines?

The only contraindication to any of the 3 approved COVID-19 vaccines is an allergy to the active substance or any of the other ingredients of the vaccine you are going to receive. The Green Book (a publication from the Department of Health and Public Health England that has information and guidance on immunisations against infectious diseases for the UK) says that the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines should not be given to those who have had a previous systemic allergic reaction (including immediate-onset anaphylaxis) to: 

  • a previous dose of the same COVID-19 vaccine; or
  • any component (excipient or inactive ingredient) of the COVID-19 vaccine.

It also says that individuals who have a systemic allergic reaction to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine should not be given a dose of the Moderna vaccine, and vice versa.

This means that people with other types of allergies can receive the vaccines.

However, you should talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before you are given the vaccine if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction or breathing problems after any other vaccine injection, or if you have any other allergies. And this will also be part of the screening process when you arrive for your vaccine.

Will the MHRA be able to access information and data from other countries for research purposes?

The MHRA has agreements with drug regulators in some countries that means they can share information and data, such as evaluations of confidential clinical trial data, as well as data on adverse event reports once vaccines are being rolled out. The drug companies that conduct COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials has a duty to share all the clinical trial data and pharmacovigilance data (where the effects of drugs are monitored after being licensed) from anywhere in the world, with all the countries that are in the process of approving or that have approved the vaccine. In addition,  clinical trial results are published in international clinical trial registers (for example the EU Clinical Trials Register and the US ClinicalTrials.gov. ) However, not all data will be available to the general public.
 


We are grateful to the following companies for supporting our Lymphoma Action COVID-19 video and webinar series. They have had no input into the programmes or their content.

AbbVie

Janssen

Recordati Rare Diseases

Roche